Someone You Know is Lost. Do You Care?

by Jan 7, 2020

Someone You Know is Lost. Do You Care?

by Jan 7, 2020

Most of the people around us probably know that we’re Christians. Throughout the years, we’ve had tons of conversation with them about life, God, and the Bible We press on in prayer for our family, longtime friends, colleagues, and neighbors. We’ve had countless opportunities to pray with them when they’re facing challenges.

And sometimes it feels like we’re hitting a wall. Change is slow and minimal. Our momentum begins to fade as disappointment sets in. And we sink into a space, where we have a lack of enthusiasm and concern. And our hearts become stagnate toward the hope of seeing them redeemed and made whole by God.

Have you ever experienced something like this? I have and do experience this. I normally throw my biggest pity parties when I’m not focused on the gospel. When I’m consumed with what I’m doing and what I think is not working. Instead of what God has already done and is doing, in which I cannot see yet.

It’s when I’m rehearsing the gospel truths to myself “on the daily” that I’m more Christ-consumed than self-consumed. I’m just one person with a very limited capacity. But Jesus is not just any person, and with Him nothing is impossible. Literally preaching the gospel to your own soul, will take your eyes off yourself, and onto Someone much greater.

In the Book of Romans, we see this gospel effect occurring in Paul’s heart. In chapters five and six, Paul celebrates the righteousness we have in Christ apart from the law, and the freedom we have against sin. In chapter seven, he explains yet the battle we still have with sin, because our body of flesh has not been fully redeemed yet.

Then like an ending of a fireworks show, Paul lights up the sky with all kinds of amazing gospel truths. Because of Christ, we’ve got the life-giving Spirit within us (8:1-11). Because of Christ, we’re no longer slaves, but we’ve been ransomed and adopted into the family of God “by whom we cry out, ‘Abba’, ‘Father!’” (8:15). Because of Christ, we’ve got a future inheritance that outweighs any suffering we’ll experience (8:18). And because of Christ, the Spirit of God intercedes for us, the Father is working nothing but good for us, and the Son is protecting us in his love, and empowering us for victory.

Rehearsing just a few of these gospel truths does wonders to our hearts. Praying through these truths not only uplifts our spirit, but in creates a sincere and enduring heart for the lost. And this is what we see with Paul in chapter nine of Romans.

After Paul wrote such deep revelations on the gospel of Christ, it stirred up a holy burden for his own people. We see this in 9:2-3: “I have great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my heart. For I could wish that I myself were cursed and cut off from Christ for the benefit of my brothers and sisters, my own flesh and blood.” Being in awe of God’s grace toward us should lead to worship, and also a burden for the lost. We want those around us to share in these amazing blessings that are now ours.

Meditating on the gospel every day will equip us with what we need to keep praying and having meaningful conversations with those around us. We want our family and friends to share in all we have that’s expressed in Romans 8. As Milton Vincent has said “to have a Romans 9 kind of burden for non-Christians, we should become practiced at celebrating the gospel as Paul does in Romans 5-8.” If you’re feeling a lack of enthusiasm and concern for the lost—spend time rehearsing, singing, preaching, praying, and receiving the gospel truths found God’s word.